Remembering Temple Quarter’s first innovators and entrepreneurs

By Professor Tim Cole, Professor of Social History and Director of Brigstow Institute

John Anthony Hare visits the Temple Island site

Responsible innovation will be at the heart of Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus and although it’s currently a levelled building site, the land has a rich history of innovation and entrepreneurship.

One example of this is John Hare and Company. Founded in 1782, it manufactured floor-cloths which were highly sought after and exported around the world. Records show that its prized floor-cloths were sent to five continents.

John Hare and Company was a 19th-century innovator. It was the only company to own the whole manufacturing process, weaving the cloth from flax and hemp, making the paint and printing the intricate patterns on to the stretched canvases – all within a mile radius of the Temple Island site.

I was lucky enough to meet a direct descendent of the first John Hare recently, 83-year old John Anthony Hare. He got in touch after reading the work of some of our history students, who have been researching the history of site that will be home to our new campus.

John Anthony Hare and his son Rupert visit the Temple Island site with Tim Cole

I invited John and his son Rupert to visit the site to see where his ancestor started the family floor-cloth business. Visiting this site that was once home to the Hare Colour Works and will become the site of the new University of Bristol campus, John told me: “It’s quite emotional to be standing here actually. It makes me really proud of my family for building such a successful business here in Bristol. It’s exciting to think it could produce the next generation of businessmen and women too.”

John and Rupert plan to follow the campus as work develops and a new generation of innovators and entrepreneurs make this place their home. You can find out more about our plans here.

Taking theatre to the community

By Department of Theatre second-year students Mathilde Hirth, Hannah Jones, Clara Friedrichs and Imogen Withers

Image from 2018 Family Theatre Day. Photo Credit: Lizzy Cummins, Travelling Light Theatre

Working with Travelling Light Theatre Company and our lecturer Jess McCormack in the Department of Theatre, we’ve created performances for a Family Theatre Day 11-4pm on Saturday 4 May at Barton Hill Settlement. We’ve organised how the event will run and promoted it among families in the local communities. During the day, families in Lawrence Hill are invited to drop in, watch performances and enjoy other activities held by the Travelling Light Theatre Company Youth Board.

Members of the Youth Board collaborated with University of Bristol students to come up with activities to go alongside the performances. Through several workshops, we explored the role of facilitation and different ways of making theatre for young audiences. The aim of the theatre pieces and the day itself is to give the children a place to be imaginative and inventive – where they are as much part of the performance as the performers. We will take the audience on a journey under the sea, into a world of music, to a little post office at Barton Hill and to save our planet from plastic.

Image from 2018 Family Theatre Day. Photo Credit: Lizzy Cummins, Travelling Light Theatre

Being involved in the Family Theatre Day and the school performances has been a great experience. Sometimes at university you can lose sight of what you’re doing the degree for – and you can get stuck in the academic bubble of lectures and deadlines. Interacting with communities that we don’t normally get to meet, and may get to work with after graduating, gives a new perspective and context to everything we learn in our courses. Creating theatre for children is refreshing, fun and so important. It’s great to know our performances could have an influence on the way they see the world and themselves in the future.

We have loved this project in so many different ways. From exploring information about Barton Hill Settlement to making a real piece for the festival, it has been great fun. We love the fact that we’re getting to interact with a community in Bristol. A lot of students don’t get that chance and it’s given us the opportunity to consider what sort of theatre we want to share – and important messages we want to explore through theatre.

We feel so lucky to be a part of such a fun and diverse festival. We often make theatre and show it to our peers. But to go outside of the university, share it with the wider communities beyond our theatre bubble and take time to bring a little joy and fun to some children’s everyday life has been amazing and inspiring.

Supported by proposed Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus, the Family Theatre Day is a free day of fun for families with children 4+. From 11-4pm on Saturday 4 May, the team will be putting on four exciting performances, painting faces and holding a cake and crafts sale. Donations will go to Travelling Light Youth Theatre, based in Barton Hill Settlement.

What can universities do for cities and their people?

A blog post from Professor Guy Orpen Deputy Vice-Chancellor, New Campus Development. 

This was the question in our minds on 29th March. A day that was previously marked as the UK’s farewell from Europe, insteaheld the first Bristol Forum in City Hall. The landmark event was put together by the universities of Bristol and the West of England in partnership with a wide range of city organisations. 

I was on a panel answering questions from around the hall during an exciting day full of presentations, discussions and debates. The proposition was that the research capability of the universities – coupled with the knowledge and capability from the city and its people – could address local challenges. I sensed a real buzz of willingness and optimism to work together in the hall. 

The panel was asked a variety of questions. Two that particularly stuck in my mind were: 

Q: How could we make the buzz today last? 

A (from me)If we get investment and partners from outside the city to support the research, we can turn this into further action. 

Q: How could the universities contribute problem solving capacity to address the city’s challenges?” 

A: I suggested we should change this question to “How could universities help solve the problems facing the city and its communities?”We can, and should, work together on research and developing evidence to support policy making and delivery – and we’re already doing this, for example in health, through Bristol Health Partners. 

But more directly, the way the University evolves can help address some long-standing challenges our city facesAn obvious example is that the Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus will help open eastern access to Temple Meads for all (with the help of Network Rail, WECA and the Council). And the campus can also help create investment in the area to support new jobs and homes nearby, generating opportunities for our neighbours.  

The star of the panel was Nasra Ayub, the undergraduate officer of the Bristol Students Union. She spoke passionately about the opportunities that university life and education had given her – and lit up the meeting with evidence of the contributions students can make to the city.  

So the first Bristol Forum was a great success – but it raised as many questions as it settled. How can we get business more involved? How can we get more funding for health research and other areas to work with our city partners? How do we enable and respect participation in research by small organisations and individuals? How should we debate and resolve contentious areas of the relationships between the city and its universities?  

These questions are particularly relevant in relation to our development plans for the Temple Quarter Enterprise Campus. You can find out more about our plans here.